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Essential health information from local experts

Posted: Jul 18, 2018

Where’s Baby? Look Before You Lock!

Summer's swelter is in full swing. So, this is the perfect time for all of us to remind ourselves (and loved ones) to Look Before You Lock and pledge to prevent child heatstroke in cars.

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Posted: May 11, 2018

Breast Cancer: The Genetic Risk

By SMH Certified Genetic Counselor Nicole Wood

Cancer—especially breast cancer—often seems to run in families. This could be because the relatives share certain lifestyle habits or have the same environmental exposures. Occasionally, though, the cancer can be inherited—a mutation in the genetic code that is passed down from generation to generation.

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Posted: May 1, 2018

Fighting Preeclampsia, Raising Awareness

Preeclampsia is a rapidly progressive disorder in pregnant women that is characterized by elevated blood pressure and protein in urine. Affecting both the pregnant mother and the growing, unborn child, it can occur during pregnancy and immediately after a woman gives birth. Preeclampsia is a leading cause of premature birth. Each year, the disorder is to blame for about 76,000 maternal deaths and a half-million infant deaths worldwide. Doctors do not fully understand what causes preeclampsia, and the only cure for the condition begins with delivery.
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Posted: Apr 2, 2018

Is Hiring a Personal Trainer Worth It?

By HealthFit Manager Kayla Frimmel

Exercise can be great medicine, but for those who are new to it or have taken an extended break, working with a personal trainer might be just the thing you need to develop a safe, effective routine that optimizes strength and weight, and boosts your daily living ability and endurance. 
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Posted: Dec 18, 2017

Is Male Breast Cancer Hereditary?

WRITTEN BY SMH CERTIFIED GENETIC COUNSELOR NICOLE WOOD

Like women, men have breast tissue. Men lack the hormones required to stimulate breast tissue growth, so it usually stays flat and small. However, also like women, men can develop cancer in their breast tissue. In general, the chances of this happening are slim, less than 0.5 percent, making it a rare form of cancer. This low number is likely due to a combination of hormonal factors and simply not having as much breast tissue as women do. However, in 2017 approximately 2,470 men are expected to be diagnosed with the disease.
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